The World Of HalfCrazyGirl

Apr 15 2014
congo-mondele:

Kodak picture of an army band during the celebrations for the 50th anniversary of the Belgian administration in the province of Katanga (Belgian Congo), 1950.

congo-mondele:

Kodak picture of an army band during the celebrations for the 50th anniversary of the Belgian administration in the province of Katanga (Belgian Congo), 1950.

(Source: old-faces)

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magictransistor:

Royal Kuba Masqueraders (Kuba Kingdom), Nsheng, Kasai, Congo, 1909.

magictransistor:

Royal Kuba Masqueraders (Kuba Kingdom), Nsheng, Kasai, Congo, 1909.

(Source: vub.ac.be)

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anthonytsakiridis:

D. R. Congo - Katanga

"I've been to Africa, looking for my soul 

And I feel like an actor looking for a role”

- Rolling Stones

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manufactoriel:

Kinshasha 1982, by Alex Webb

manufactoriel:

Kinshasha 1982, by Alex Webb

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manufactoriel:

A la piscine, Kinshasa Congo, 1967

manufactoriel:

A la piscine, Kinshasa Congo, 1967

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ourafrica:

Kinshasa the capital of Democratic Republic of Congo is no ordinary city and at first seems an unlikely place to have an orchestra of two hundred musicians playing to Beethoven Ninth –Freude schöner Götterfunken. “Orchestre Symphonique Kimbanguisteisthe only symphony orchestra in the Congo has been in existence for 15 yrs. Riddled often with power strikes, even on performance nights, seems the least of the worries of this symphony. Kinshasa Symphony directed by Martin Baer, Claus Wischmann is a study of people in one of the world’s most chaotic cities doing their best to maintain one of the most complex systems of joint human endeavour: a symphony. The film is about the Congo, the people in Kinshasa and the power of music.

The film closely follows a few of the band members and gives a view of their personal lives, how they make a living and struggle to make it to almost daily practices. We get to see the symphony overcome odds as they prepare for an open concert with thousands attending.

The DRC does not stop with these classical musicians all self taught amateurs or trained by other musicians unfamiliar in classical training with instruments like the cello, cello bass or violin. Kinshasa continues to stand out with its remarkable musicians forming this indie breed of rudimentary collectives that play with scrap yard instruments yet seem to stand on stages from Brooklyn to Paris. Other bands I should make note of are : Konono Nº1 who collaborated with Bjork on the song earth intruders and more recently with Herbie Hancock and Baloji. Also take note of Kasai All Stars.

Kinshasa Symphony has made its rounds in the theatre circuit and is available on DVD. Its playing as part of the featured screenings  next week, in New York’s College music festival CMJ.

Here is the trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=_vTk0XsgZV4

Info via, African digital art

Follow us on  Twitter and Instagram

(Source: ourafrica)

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nba:

Joakim Noah of the Chicago Bulls address the crowd prior to the Bulls last regular season home game, against the Orlando Magic, on April 14, 2014 at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois.
(Photo by Gary Dineen/NBAE via Getty Images)

nba:

Joakim Noah of the Chicago Bulls address the crowd prior to the Bulls last regular season home game, against the Orlando Magic, on April 14, 2014 at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois.

(Photo by Gary Dineen/NBAE via Getty Images)

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cjwho:

Haus der Waldeulen, Wolfurt, Austria by Riegger Bär Architekten

Die Waldeulen sind ein Verein zur Förderung der Wald- und Erlebnispädagogik. Der Spielraum Wald dient dabei als ganzheitliche Wahrnehmungsförderung und Sinnesschulung sowie intensive Bewegungserfahrungen in der Natur. Märchenhafte und fantasieanregende Spielmöglichkeiten durch spielerisches Lernen von ökologischen Zusammenhängen. Um dieses Angebot durchgängig d.h. auch bei sehr schlechter Witterung anbieten zu können, ist es erforderlich den Spielraum „Wald“ durch eine Schutzhütte zu ergänzen, in welcher Kinder und Erzieher bei sehr schlechten (nassen/kalten) Witterungsbedingungen Schutz und Aufenthaltsmöglichkeit finden. Die Schutzhütte, der sog. „Waldsetzkasten“ ist als ein von aussen offenes Regal geplant. Die umlaufenden Regalflächen dienen den Kindern z.B. als Aufbewahrungsort ihrer Waldfundstücke, als Insektenhotel oder gar als Futterstelle für die Waldbewohner. Im inneren beherbergt der „Waldsetzkasten“ einen geschlossenen Raum der in den oben beschriebenen Fällen zum Aufwärmen und zum Jausen dient. Vorgelagert zu diesem Bereich befindet sich ein offener, jedoch gedeckter Unterschlupf.

Photography: Adolf Breuter

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

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Feb 28 2014
cafecongo:

Vu à Kinshasa. Costumes preppy, cigares et pipes étaient de rigueur pour les membres de la sape, la communauté de fashion victimes élégantes et déjantées, à l’occasion de la commémoration de la mort de leur “fondateur”, Stervos Niarcos Ngashie, lundi dernier. Il avait aussi fondé la religion “Kitendi” qui signifie vêtements en lingala. Photo : Junior D. Kannah/AFP

cafecongo:

Vu à Kinshasa. Costumes preppy, cigares et pipes étaient de rigueur pour les membres de la sape, la communauté de fashion victimes élégantes et déjantées, à l’occasion de la commémoration de la mort de leur “fondateur”, Stervos Niarcos Ngashie, lundi dernier. Il avait aussi fondé la religion “Kitendi” qui signifie vêtements en lingala. Photo : Junior D. Kannah/AFP

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pulitzercenter:

GOMA, Congo—“You come here, you play hard, you work hard.”

That’s what Dario Merlo says to those asking to join PJB, or Promo Jeune Basket (Promote Youth Basketball), a basketball program in Goma, the largest city in eastern Congo. There are plenty of takers—currently more than 650 kids, ages 5 to 25, boys and girls, all learning to be masters of the three-man weave and the pick-and-roll.

Dario was born in Goma and moved to Belgium in 1994 during the Rwandan genocide. He was 11 at the time, just the right age to fall in love with basketball. He played whenever he got the chance.

He studied history and social science in Brussels, and, in December 2005,  returned to Goma. He immediately found a league so he could keep playing basketball. When a friend didn’t show up for a pick-up game he found four kids to play with. He soon became a regular, teaching these boys a few drills, working on their jump-shots and lay-ups. Before long, he was buying them new shoes and paying their school fees.

At first it was just for fun. But by 2009, Dario had become serious about starting a youth basketball program–one that would transform lives. That’s when he created PJB and then oversaw the building of three new basketball stadiums.

Dario does have a day job—he is country director for the Jane Goodall Institute, a global conservation non-profit. PJB is part of the Institute’s Roots & Shoots movement that involves youth from more than 130 countries in community service. And it is Jane Goodall herself, humanitarian and chimpanzee expert, who inspires him to carry on.

Instead of coaching, Dario now recruits coaches and helps train them, a responsibility he does not take lightly. “A coach is a leader and a role model for everybody,” he explains. “A coach cannot be drunk in the street.”

Read the rest of the article written by Pulitzer Center Contributing Editor Kem Knapp Sawyer. Images by Kem Knapp Sawyer and A.Graham/PJB. Congo, 2013.

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cafecongo:

fashizblackdiary: The wide leg pants trend, captured by angolan/congolese photographer Ambroise Nyagimoko in Kinshasa circa 1973-1974.

cafecongo:

fashizblackdiary: The wide leg pants trend, captured by angolan/congolese photographer Ambroise Nyagimoko in Kinshasa circa 1973-1974.

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Jan 22 2014
Jan 17 2014

maikhofranco:

19th Coco Festival 

San Pablo Coco Festival is celebrated during the month of January to honor Saint Paul the Hermit, the patron saint of San Pablo. It is a week-long celebration held during the first and second week of January.

(via lensblr-network)

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Jan 12 2014
newsweek:

It was an open secret that one of the Democratic Republic of Congo’s worst tormentors, Bosco Ntaganda, lived on Avenue des Tulipés until 2012, crossing into Rwanda now and then despite a travel ban. Rich off the proceeds of the illegal tax revenues he imposed on local mines, he served as a general in the Congolese army.
For a wanted fugitive, the man nicknamed “the Terminator” lived a comfortable and unencumbered life. Six years before, a warrant for his arrest had been issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for his role in recruiting child soldiers.
Goma, the capital of Congo, is still trying to reintegrate these former combatants: boys now in their teens who were forced to become killers before they had reached puberty and now struggle to be seen as victims. A second warrant for Ntaganda, issued in July 2012, added four more counts of war crimes and three more of crimes against humanity. But no one wanted to move on Ntaganda.
It was widely acknowledged he was useful – an important interlocutor in a region that is perpetually about to slide back into violence. Ntaganda’s apparent impunity was a neon sign that the ICC’s reach and relevance, 12 years on from its creation, were weak and waning, and that justice for war criminals remains subordinate to global realpolitik.
Now, a cynical, targeted attack on the ICC by two Kenyan leaders charged with crimes against humanity has lifted the hood on the flaws in the global “court of last resort”.
Through what one experienced court insider calls “a dirty-tricks campaign,” the two killers are attempting to discredit and dismantle a system that, while far from perfect, metes out justice to victims of warlords and those responsible for state-sanctioned abuse.
(Getting Away With Murder)

newsweek:

It was an open secret that one of the Democratic Republic of Congo’s worst tormentors, Bosco Ntaganda, lived on Avenue des Tulipés until 2012, crossing into Rwanda now and then despite a travel ban. Rich off the proceeds of the illegal tax revenues he imposed on local mines, he served as a general in the Congolese army.

For a wanted fugitive, the man nicknamed “the Terminator” lived a comfortable and unencumbered life. Six years before, a warrant for his arrest had been issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for his role in recruiting child soldiers.

Goma, the capital of Congo, is still trying to reintegrate these former combatants: boys now in their teens who were forced to become killers before they had reached puberty and now struggle to be seen as victims. A second warrant for Ntaganda, issued in July 2012, added four more counts of war crimes and three more of crimes against humanity. But no one wanted to move on Ntaganda.

It was widely acknowledged he was useful – an important interlocutor in a region that is perpetually about to slide back into violence. Ntaganda’s apparent impunity was a neon sign that the ICC’s reach and relevance, 12 years on from its creation, were weak and waning, and that justice for war criminals remains subordinate to global realpolitik.

Now, a cynical, targeted attack on the ICC by two Kenyan leaders charged with crimes against humanity has lifted the hood on the flaws in the global “court of last resort”.

Through what one experienced court insider calls “a dirty-tricks campaign,” the two killers are attempting to discredit and dismantle a system that, while far from perfect, metes out justice to victims of warlords and those responsible for state-sanctioned abuse.

(Getting Away With Murder)

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